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Creating Killer Content

Killer Films, which has been accepting NZ interns for some years, has joined forces with Glass Elevator Media to create Killer Content. The Killer Films brand will be retained for theatrical releases only.

Over the last few years, Script to Screen and the NZFC have been supporting six-month internships with Killer Films in New York, the most recent beneficiary of the sceme being Sally Tran. Previous interns were Catherine Bisley, Dianna Fuemana, Michelle Savill and Leo Woodhead.

In 2010 Killer Films founder Christine Vachon visited NZ, running a one-day seminar, Everything Is New Again: Create, Aggregate, Liberate, and mentoring on Script-to-Screen’s Script Focus programme.

Killer was founded in 1995 and is a long-standing darling of the US indie scene, having had its hands on over 40 comepleted titles in the last two decades. Killer has a particularly fruitful relationship with Todd Haynes, whose five-time Emmy winner for HBO, mini-seriesMildred Pierce, and Oscar nominees Far From Heaven and I’m Not There form part of the Killer catalogue.

FAR FROM HEASVEN

Far From heaven: Julianne Moore, Christine Vachon, Todd Haynes and Dennis Quaid

Killer has recently completed production on Hayne’s Carol, adapted from Patricia Highsmith’sThe Price of Salt.

Glass Elevator is an incubator which aims to develop material for multi-platform or transmedia exploitation. CEO Adrienne Becker describer the new company as “an emerging leader in entertainment for the multi-platform age, investing in a curated group of creators and brands at the intersection of professional storytelling and technology”.

New York and Los Angeles production house Union Editorial has also bought into the new company.

Killer and Glass Elevator have been working together for a year on a feature adaptation of Helen Schulman’s This Beautiful Life for Danish director Susanne Bier (Oscar winner In a Better World and nominee After the Wedding ).

In a statement, Killer’s Pam Koffler said the decision to join forces was “natural, organic and unpremeditated.”